THE DEPARTMENT IN THE NEWS

Dr. Ilir Agalliu, MD, ScD

Assistant Professor

01/21/2016 - Dr. Ilir Agalliu and Dr. Robert Burk were recently interviewed by several media including NBC News, Newsweek, UPI and Medscape about their recent study on oral HPVs and risk of head and neck cancers, which was published at JAMA Oncology on January 21, 2016. In this study they found that when human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 is detected in peoples’ mouths, they are 22 times more likely than those without HPV-16 to develop oropharyngeal cancer (cancers of the middle part of the throat including the soft palate, the base of the tongue and the tonsils). This study is the first to demonstrate conclusively that HPV-16’s presence in the oral cavity precedes the development of oropharyngeal cancers. In addition, the researchers found for the first time that the presence of other types of oral HPVs—beta- and gamma-HPVs, which are usually detected in the skin—was also associated with the development of head and neck cancers, indicating a broader role for HPVs in causing these cancers than has been recognized to date. This study shows that using easily collected oral mouthwash samples may help in predicting people’s risk for developing head and neck cancers

NBC News
http://www.nbcnews.com/health/cancer/hpv-raises-head-cancer-risk-sevenfold-study-finds-n501526

Newsweek
http://www.newsweek.com/hpv-infections-increase-risk-head-and-neck-cancer-418741

Medscape:
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/857650

UPI:
http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2016/01/21/Oral-HPV-significantly-increases-chance-of-head-neck-cancer/4401453409462/


Dr. Thomas Rohan, MBBS, PhD

Chairman and Professor

10/01/2015 - Each fall, The Estee Lauder Companies (ELC) launches a global breast cancer campaign to raise funds in support of breast cancer research. In the U.S., they kick off these activities by ringing the bell at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). Dr. Thomas Rohan participated in this event, joining William Lauder, along with ELC executives and employees, on the podium to ring the closing bell at NYSE on October 1.


http://livestream.com/NYSE/Esteelauder2


Dr. Judith Wylie-Rosett, Ed.D., R.D.

Professor

06/16/2015 - NJ.com interviewed Judith Wylie-Rosett, EdD, RD about the Food and Drug Administration removal of trans fat from the Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) additives that can be used in foods. The interview addressed sources of trans fat in the American diet and the implication of the ban resulting from removal from the GRAS list.


http://www.nj.com/healthfit/index.ssf/2015/06/in_wake_of_fda_ban_where_trans_fats_might_still_be.html


Dr. Judith Wylie-Rosett, Ed.D., R.D.

Professor

02/16/2015 - Time magazine interviewed Judith Wylie-Rosett, EdD, RD about a recent meta-analysis of six trials in which people were randomly assigned to eat higher or lower amounts of dietary fat that found no difference in heart attacks and mortality rates. The interview addressed how changes in the evidence base are reflected in changes in dietary guidelines for fat intake.


http://time.com/tag/heart-disease/


H. Dean Hosgood, PhD

Professor

09/11/2014 - Nature interviewed H. Dean Hosgood, PhD, regarding the unusually high number of women from east Asia developing lung cancer, even though only a few of them smoke tobacco. Dr. Hosgood described how some of the lung cancer risk in east Asia is attributed to their unique environmental exposures, particularly household air pollution due to coal and biomass burning for heating and cooking. Dr. Hosgood highlighted a stove change program that led to the dramatic decrease in lung cancer rates in one particular community. He also emphasized that research on lung cancer among non-smokers is becoming increasingly important given that as tobacco smoking rates decrease, other risk factors will become a larger proportion of lung cancer cases.


http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v513/n7517_supp/full/513S16a.html


Ruth Macklin, PhD

Professor

08/15/2014 - The Dallas Morning News interviewed Ruth Macklin, PhD, regarding the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Dr. Macklin explored the ethical questions surrounding experimental treatment for Ebola: who should be the first to receive unproven medications? Who should pay for them? And who should decide these controversial questions? Dr. Macklin argues that Africans in the hardest hit areas should be the first to receive the limited experimental drugs.


http://www.dallasnews.com/opinion/sunday-commentary/20140815-qa-dr.-ruth-macklin-on-the-ethics-of-experimental-ebola-treatments.ece


Qibin Qi, PhD

Assistant Professor

06/18/2014 - A genetic variant in the FTO gene, the strongest obesity gene identified so far, is associated with increased total energy intake, according to a study conducted in 16,094 children and adolescents by Qibin Qi, PhD that was reported in the Presidents Oral Presentation session at the American Diabetes Association Meeting, San Francisco. In addition, this study also suggests that the association between the FTO genetic variant and obesity might be amplified by high dietary protein intake.

Medpagetoday
http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/ADA/46380

Endocrinetoday
http://www.healio.com/endocrinology/highlights-from-ada-2014/researcher-underscores-association-between-gene-variant-adiposity-in-children-adolescents


Dr. Alyson B. Moadel, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

06/04/2014 - WNYC (New York NPR affiliate) features the BOLD Buddy Program directed by Dr. Alyson Moadel-Robblee. This piece was part of a series, “RX for the BX,” which focused on healthcare in the Bronx in June 2014.The BOLD (Bronx Oncology Living Daily) Buddies program partners newly-diagnosed cancer patients with survivors. Dr. Moadel-Robblee founded the support program due in part to her mother’s experience battling breast cancer virtually alone.

article
http://www.wnyc.org/story/a-helping-hand-with-cancer-treatment/


Dr. Thomas Rohan, MBBS, PhD

Chairman and Professor

06/03/2014 - The larger the count of microanatomic structures called TMEMs (for Tumor Microenvironment of Metastasis), detected in tumor tissue from primary breast cancers using a triple immunostain, the greater the risk of metastases at sites distant from the primary tumor, according to a study by Thomas Rohan, MD, PhD that was published today in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. This association did not change even after adjusting for classical histopathologic factors such as tumor size and grade.

JNCI News release
http://www.einstein.yu.edu/news/releases/1012/study-new-test-predicts-if-breast-cancer-will-spread/


Robert Kaplan, PhD

Professor

Carmen Isasi, MD, PhD

Associate Professor

03/09/2014 - ABC TV’s Tiempo program interviewed Robert Kaplan, PhD and Carmen Isasi, MD, PhD about the release of the initial findings from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), the landmark research study of Hispanic/Latino health funded by the National Institutes of Health. Data from a study of 16,000 people of diverse Hispanic origin in four U.S. cities (Bronx, Chicago, Miami and San Diego) show significant variations in disease prevalence and health behaviors among groups with different backgrounds. Teasing out these variations can help clinicians; public health advocates and members of the community focus their energies in the right places


Tiempo -ABC news


Robert Kaplan, PhD

Professor

02/27/2014 - The New York Daily News quotes Robert Kaplan, PhD in an article on the health status of the Bronx Puerto Rican community based on finding from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). Puerto Ricans in the Bronx had higher than national average smoking rates, reported high levels of depression and showed a higher prevalence of obesity than other Hispanic groups.

article
Daily News article


Mark Kuniholm, PhD

Assistant Professor

01/15/2014 - The first study of hepatitis C infection among different Hispanic groups in the U.S. has found that infection with the virus varies widely, with Puerto Rican Hispanics much more likely than other groups to be infected. The study highlights which Hispanic populations would benefit most from increased hepatitis C testing and treatment. It was published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases and was led by researchers in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, including: Mark H. Kuniholm, PhD, Molly Jung, MPH, Ryung Kim, PhD, Howard D. Strickler, MD, Robert C. Kaplan, PhD and Gloria Y. Ho, PhD. The study was covered by 37 media outlets, including:

Huffington Post
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/15/hepatitis-c-varies-hispanics_n_4602328.html

Fox News Latino
http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/health/2014/01/18/hepatitis-c-doesnt-affect-all-latinos-equally-puerto-ricans-infected-10-times/

Univision Salud
http://salud.univision.com/es/enfermedades-infecciosas/hepatitis-c-se-expande-en-hispanos


Dr. Thomas Rohan, MBBS, PhD

Chairman and Professor

Geoffrey C. Kabat, PhD, MS

Senior Epidemiologist

07/25/2013 - The taller a postmenopausal woman is, the greater her risk for developing cancer, according to a study by Geoffrey C. Kabat, PhD and Thomas Rohan, MD, PhD that was published today in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Height was linked to cancers of the breast, colon, endometrium, kidney, ovary, rectum, and thyroid, as well as to multiple myeloma and melanoma. These associations did not change even after adjusting for factors known to influence these cancers. The study included 20,928 women recruited to the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), the largest, multi-site longitudinal study looking at risks among postmenopausal women.

NBC News
http://www.nbcnews.com/health/taller-women-more-likely-get-cancer-large-study-finds-6C10746890

USA Today
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/07/25/study-links-women-height-cancer/2576401/

Prevention.com
http://www.prevention.com/health/health-concerns/scary-link-between-height-and-cancer-risk